History/Political

The Serendipitous Creation

The Serendipitous Creation of the Indiana Statewide System of Medical Education follows key individuals, events, and developments that led to a surprising solution: the creation of the network of facilities that comprises the State Medical Education System today. It starts with the Problem: Indiana losing ground in its ability to furnish doctors for the populace, then continues on to the Diagnosis: the Stoner Commission asked to fathom the medical education dilemma. From there it explains the Prescription: a new bill is lobbied into effect, a new four-year medical school is (almost) put in South Bend, and a phoenix arises from...

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A Critique of Roe vs. Wade

From the introduction: This treatise is dedicated to the multitude of pro life advocates who have worked unceasingly to stop the senseless killing of little persons in their mothers’ wombs. The pro lifers’ work has been mammoth but with little results because their main attack has been based on morality. As a whole, the 21st century morals of our country are lower than a hernia on a bull fighter. Roe v. Wade will never be reversed for the reason that the killing of a little person is immoral but it will be reversed because it is a legal hoax perpetrated...

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Indiana Supreme Court Annual Reports, 1999 through 2010

Produced annually, these reports provide information about the work of the Indiana Supreme Court. Included with the statistical data is an overview of the significant events of each fiscal year and a description of the activities of the Court and its affiliated agencies. For more information about the Court, its history, and its various agencies and programs, visit www.IN.gov/judiciary.

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Slavery Cases in the Indiana Supreme Court

In 1787 the Founding Fathers devised both the Northwest Ordinance and the new U.S. Constitution. These documents created the theoretical and practical foundations for a fledgling nation’s political and physical growth. While launched in the same year, the two documents have startling differences in their approach to questions of slavery. The crafters of the Constitution carefully avoided using the word “slavery,” but gave it their tacit approval by including provisions regarding fugitive slaves, allowing slaves to be counted as three-fifths of a person for taxation and representation, and continuing the international slave trade until at least 1808. In striking contrast, the Northwest Ordinance clearly prohibited slavery and indentured servitude in...

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Jesse Lynch Holman, Pioneer Hoosier

Biography is one tool for studying our shared past. The lives of the earliest members of the Indiana Supreme Court provide an intriguing opportunity to glimpse both the social and legal history of our state in its earliest years. This offering from the Indiana Supreme Court’s Legal History Series documents the legacy of Judge Jesse Lynch Holman, one of the original three members of Indiana’s highest court. Holman initially served the people of Indiana as a federally appointed judge of the Indiana Territory. When we became a state, Governor Jennings appointed Holman to the Indiana Supreme Court alongside John Johnson and James Scott. He later served as...

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Indiana’s Supreme Court in the Civil War

More than 100 years after Lee's surrender at Appomattox Courthouse, the Civil War continues to capture the attention of Americans in general and Hoosiers in particular. There is good reason for this. Indiana's war-time governor, Oliver Perry Morton, was an ardent supporter of both the war and President Lincoln. Morton battled with the Indiana legislature over funds to pay for wartime expenses. These expenses were not inconsiderable given the willingness of Hoosiers to volunteer for service. In fact, Indiana contributed more soldiers per capita than any other state, providing a full 10% of the Union fighting force. In this life...

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Indiana’s Constitution in a Nation of Constitutions

Like Professor Baude, I find that the arduous work performed by the framers of the first Indiana state constitution is often underappreciated by the public. The events that took place at Corydon in 1816 beneath the broad branches of the Constitutional Elm are just as important to Indiana as the work of the convention held at Independence Hall, only a few decades earlier, where a similar body of learned men formed our national government. Yet, most Hoosiers have very little knowledge of the events that transpired in Corydon and why. Professor Patrick Baude of Indiana University School of Law - Bloomington aims to right this wrong. His examination of...

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